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BEHAVIOUR IN WOOD

Forests enrich our lives and the environment in many ways. They stabilize the soil, they are the habitat for the plant and animal world, they clean the air and the water, bind greenhouse gases, create income and working places and provide us with a healthy space for recreation. Every one of us can contribute to the preservation of forests and their functions, so that the future generations can enjoy the welfare of forests like we are doing today.

That is why, before we go into a forest, it is very IMPORTANT TO KNOW:

• A CAR DOESN'T BELONG IN THE FOREST
• DO NOT DAMAGE THE TREES
• DO NOT DAMAGE THE FOREST VEGETATION
• DO NOT START FIRE WHERE YOU CAN'T CONTROL IT
• DO NOT LEAVE WASTE IN WOOD
• DO NOT DESTROY SIGNS AND OBJECTS IN WOOD

Eco tips:

   1. After a picnic pick up all the things that you had brought with yourselves. Throw the waste into the nearest trash can or container. 
   2. Don't ever shed motorcar oil into the nature because it is higly poisonous, especially for water.
   3. Don't throw away batteries because they are highly poisonous.
   4. Don't use detergents while washing in brooks or streams.
   5. Don't ever start an open fire in the nature; if you plan to barbicue outdoors, clean the site before leaving, and throw charcoal from the grill only after you had made sure there is no live coal left.
   6. Do not pick unusual flowers, some species are rare and protected (e.g. edelweiss).
   7. Do not push your hands into cracks in rocks or trees, nor raise any stones or stumps; not only is it dangereous, but you could destroy the habitats of some species. 

 

You are here: Home Company About us Structure scheme Sume Sume BEHAVIOUR IN WOOD